Treaties Signed in Wyoming Mark 150 Years in 2018: Honoring the Spirit by Commemorating the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie

April 16, 2018—Wyoming—The Tribal Nations of the Northern Great Plains and the Fort Laramie National Historic Site are coming together to honor a significant time in Wyoming and U.S. history at the 150th anniversary of the signing of the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie to be held at Fort Laramie National Historic Site in Fort Laramie, Wyoming. The opening ceremony will take place on Saturday, April 28 from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., while opening weekend activities will continue through May 1. A full schedule is available here.

“An appropriate treaty commemoration is important to the Native American nations of the Northern Great Plains and to the National Park Service here in Fort Laramie,” said Tom Baker, superintendent for Fort Laramie National Historic Site. “Throughout the weekend, various bands will be sharing their unique cultural traditions—showing how “We are still here!”—and sharing the significant history of their people, their culture and their traditions. It’s been an honor for me to work with the tribal nations on this anniversary and to have the opportunity to truly understand the significance of what this means not only for past and present generations, but for future generations.”

The 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie was a significant event in history and took seven months to complete (April 29 – November 6, 1868) and impacted nearly every indigenous person and community across the United States. For the 150th anniversary commemoration, many Northern Plains Tribes—including the Northern Arapaho, Northern Cheyenne, bands of the Lakota and Dakota Sioux and the Crow Nation—will meet with local, state and federal representatives to commemorate this monumental anniversary. The public is invited to attend this opening program, as well as participate in commemorative events throughout the spring, summer and fall, before the commemoration concludes on November 6, 2018, 150 years after Red Cloud—the Chief of the Oglala Lakota—signed the treaty.

Earlier this year, the Wyoming Legislature passed a joint resolution to commemorate the sesquicentennial and honor the spirit of the area’s rich past and its First Nations, while also recognizing the value and respect of the historical and modern contributions of American Indian people.

"The Treaty of Fort Laramie is an integral part of not only Wyoming's history, but the history of our nation as a whole as it impacted nearly every indigenous person and community across the United States," said Diane Shober, executive director for the Wyoming Office of Tourism. "The 150th anniversary of the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie deserves our attention, especially as we honor the spirit, traditions and cultural heritage of America's First Nations." 

Visitors are encouraged to plan a weekend and stay in or around Fort Laramie and Goshen County, Wyoming. Lodging, event details and other visitor information can be found at gogoshen.net. Additional lodging is also available in nearby Platte County. For more information, visit www.plattechamber.com/visitor/lodging.

2018 also marks the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Fort Bridger, with commemorative activities planned for July 3, 2018 at Fort Bridger State Historic Site in southwest Wyoming.

For more information, visit the Wyoming Office of Tourism website or Fort Laramie National Historic Site.